ideas for cities

This Big City on tumblr is your source for ideas that can make cities better. It is curated by Joe Peach and Lucas Lindsey.

Joe founded This Big City in 2009. He is a Marketing professional and works in one of London's most sustainable buildings.

Lucas is an urbanist, futurist, and blogger. He's the child of a suburban nation, but born again believer in an urban future. He lives in Tallahassee, USA.

If you have an idea you'd like to share, click the submit button!

mikasavela:

“Demographers dismiss warnings of ‘super-cities’” New Scientist, 10 July 1986.
Well, they just were wrong. Perhaps pre-1990s the global urbanization came as bit of a surprise to everyone.

"Recent claims by the United Nations that more than half of the world’s population will soon live in cities are dismissed as "unreal.""   High-res

mikasavela:

“Demographers dismiss warnings of ‘super-cities’” New Scientist, 10 July 1986.

Well, they just were wrong. Perhaps pre-1990s the global urbanization came as bit of a surprise to everyone.

"Recent claims by the United Nations that more than half of the world’s population will soon live in cities are dismissed as "unreal.""

One can objectively judge whether urban architecture is fulfilling the most basic needs of citizens. But what about the social and emblematic functions of architecture? Who gets to say what older buildings with more complex histories symbolize?

Sharon Gochenour on the psychology of designing spaces

「人們能夠客觀判斷,都會建築是否滿足市民最基本需求,在城市漫步,也能觀察市容是否美觀,但建築的社會與象徵功能何在?誰來定義背負複雜歷史的老舊建築?」

Sharon Gochenour談論設計空間心理

John Snow was a local doctor working in Soho in the 1850s. London was then the biggest city the world had ever seen. It was a pretty unpleasant place by all accounts – cess pools in basements and cows in attics created a fetid environment. And it wasn’t just the smell; the lack of hygiene resulted in low life expectancy and disease, including cholera epidemics.

Stephanie Draper on how past urban challenges can influence future developments.

Urbanization has lured more people to bustling metropolises, but precious little thought has been given to what happens when these cities fail. Over time, the underlying systems and processes of civilization - from lead mining to offshore drilling to car commuting - slowly poison us. Power grids brown out, the climate heats up, and industrial accidents ravage ecosystems and cities alike. For all the famed cities with thousands of years of continuity - Paris, London, Cairo, Athens, Rome, Istanbul - most cities just stop.

Ben Paynter considers the longevity of the city after visiting America’s most toxic town.