ideas for cities

This Big City on tumblr is your source for ideas that can make cities better. It is curated by Joe Peach and Lucas Lindsey.

Joe founded This Big City in 2009. He is a Marketing professional and works in one of London's most sustainable buildings.

Lucas is an urbanist, futurist, and blogger. He's the child of a suburban nation, but born again believer in an urban future. He lives in Tallahassee, USA.

If you have an idea you'd like to share, click the submit button!

soundbitecity:

No Surface Without a Seat

Berlin isn’t the warmest of places, so I was continually surprised by the amount of outdoor seating around the city.  In some neighborhoods, sidewalk cafes, public benches, beer gardens, or terraces seemed to be at every turn.  But what surprised me even more than the sheer amount of seating, was the seemingly ad-hoc, improvised, or innovative nature of many of the options.  Anywhere there was a surface or some extra space, you were bound to find a cushion, a folding chair, a crate, or some recycled materials inviting you to sit down and take a break.  It wasn’t limited to restaurants and bars either - cushions and chairs could be found on the steps, ledges, sidewalks, and street corners outside of clothing stores, gift shops, and all sorts of other random places.

My visit was in April, presumably the time of year when these chairs and cushions first emerge from winter storage.  I’d be curious to take walk through the city in summertime to see them in greater use, and to see if even more sprout up.  It must create an impressively vibrant street life.

Photos taken April, 2014

Take a seat!

Starting in 2010, Long Beach’s arts council, city hall, and the now discontinued California Redevelopment Agency came together to commission a distinctive new project. They looked around the city, and found that there were a large number of plain white electrical boxes, about 6 feet tall and 3 feet by 3 feet around. Instead of leaving these boxes a dull ugly white, why not hire local artists to paint unique works of art on each of them?
Read more in our latest post   High-res

Starting in 2010, Long Beach’s arts council, city hall, and the now discontinued California Redevelopment Agency came together to commission a distinctive new project. They looked around the city, and found that there were a large number of plain white electrical boxes, about 6 feet tall and 3 feet by 3 feet around. Instead of leaving these boxes a dull ugly white, why not hire local artists to paint unique works of art on each of them?

Read more in our latest post

Movebybike will transport anything up to around 660 pounds courtesy a fleet of bike trailers,” writes Feargus O’Sullivan for The Atlantic Cities. “Initially a small project run by enthusiasts, the company expanded this year from its home base in Malmö to Stockholm and Gothenburg, thus covering Sweden’s three largest cities. Not only is the company greener than the alternative, it’s also faster and potentially cheaper.”

Read more here.

gasoline-station:

Spring Forest

by Francesco Draisci

Like giant poppy flowers (3.5m), a surreal red and pink forest of thin poles topped by 100 umbrellas, marked an urban-green spot (5m x 10m) in St James’ Church Garden in Clerkenwell, offering shaded comfort, away from the city frantic pace.Symbolising urban transformation and the awakening of spring, red foam-clad scaffolding components formed a glamorous example of reversible public environment.”

(via physical-dreamscape)

"I frequently visit René Hurtado - a fisherman who lives in a tiny house on a beach in Cabo de San Román. For years, I was obsessed with its façade made out of rotten and grey wood pieces! In one of my trips to the beach, I suggested him to make a chromatic intervention to his façade. Once I painted it, the remote house was transformed into an enormous canvas full of colours, which were immersed within this beautiful landscape having the sea as background."

Street artist Flix talks with us about his work in Caracas and beyond in our new post

My experience on the street dates back to 2003, when the Iraq war started. I decided to make some stickers containing messages against the Iraq conflict and others in favour of peace. At the same time, I wanted to place other elements on the street, such as hybrids of different ancestral cultures and characters related to robotics. They were my first totem robots.”

Caracas street artist Flix talks to us about his work