ideas for cities

This Big City on tumblr is your source for ideas that can make cities better. It is curated by Joe Peach and Lucas Lindsey.

Joe founded This Big City in 2009. He is a Marketing professional and works in one of London's most sustainable buildings.

Lucas is an urbanist, futurist, and blogger. He's the child of a suburban nation, but born again believer in an urban future. He lives in Tallahassee, USA.

If you have an idea you'd like to share, click the submit button!

Every morning, sanitation workers across Louisville start their day with a regimen of stretching. In the offices of the city’s Public Works department, even those who spend most of their days behind a desk and computer monitor begin their day with the same routine. Stretching is nothing new. But it is an integral part of Louisville’s innovation agenda.

Matthew McClellan on the innovations Louisville is deploying to create a safer workplace for City employees (and yes, it goes further than just stretching!)

cityrepresent:

These Maps Redraw Cities Based On How Long It Takes To Get Around Without A Car

The heat maps can easily tell you how far away two points are at a glance, to let you know how long your walk is going to be.

"These maps show how long it takes to get everywhere else via walking and public transit," Hardin writes in an email. "This allows you to make some important comparisons, such as ‘if I move here, I can reach half the city in 50 minutes if I start at 8 a.m.’" His paper explains more of the technical details.

humanscalecities:

Google Analytics For Physical Environments

If you run a blog or a website, tools like Google Analytics generate loads of useful data that tells you things like where your visitors come from and how they use your website. How interesting would it be to translate that idea to an offline environment? That’s exactly what Swedish-born, Amsterdam/Berlin-based artist Jonas Lund did. 
More   High-res

humanscalecities:

Google Analytics For Physical Environments

If you run a blog or a website, tools like Google Analytics generate loads of useful data that tells you things like where your visitors come from and how they use your website. How interesting would it be to translate that idea to an offline environment? That’s exactly what Swedish-born, Amsterdam/Berlin-based artist Jonas Lund did. 

More

nycopendata:

Aaron Schumacher submitted this data visualization of daily entrances into the MTA subway system. According to Aaron:
"Start with open data, then some processing, and eventually you can make a picture like this. You can also check out the interactive version, where you can see the date and number of entrances for about three years worth of subway traffic. You can clearly see traffic changes around major holidays, and especially the effects around hurricanes Irene and Sandy.”
  High-res

nycopendata:

Aaron Schumacher submitted this data visualization of daily entrances into the MTA subway system. According to Aaron:

"Start with open data, then some processing, and eventually you can make a picture like this. You can also check out the interactive version, where you can see the date and number of entrances for about three years worth of subway traffic. You can clearly see traffic changes around major holidays, and especially the effects around hurricanes Irene and Sandy.”

(via secretrepublic)

We have an opportunity to re-think how we regulate city activities for the public interest. I think the big opportunity is to harness the data streaming out of all of these activities and use it to enable a more permissive, but more accountable, “2.0” regulatory regime.

- Nick Grossman

By focusing on peer-to-peer urbanism, we would be able to create more functional and enjoyable communities while using less resources through sharing — both on and offline. By working collaboratively, there’s an opportunity to create solutions for the masses at a lower cost for the government, and therefore for tax payers. It’s problem solving by community.

Check out the interesting examples of user-generated urbanism, agile urbanism, and today’s peer-to-peer urbanism movement in Nick’s post

(via loyalcx)