ideas for cities

This Big City on tumblr is your source for ideas that can make cities better. It is curated by Joe Peach and Lucas Lindsey.

Joe founded This Big City in 2009. He is a Marketing professional and works in one of London's most sustainable buildings.

Lucas is an urbanist, futurist, and blogger. He's the child of a suburban nation, but born again believer in an urban future. He lives in Tallahassee, USA.

If you have an idea you'd like to share, click the submit button!

soundbitecity:

No Surface Without a Seat

Berlin isn’t the warmest of places, so I was continually surprised by the amount of outdoor seating around the city.  In some neighborhoods, sidewalk cafes, public benches, beer gardens, or terraces seemed to be at every turn.  But what surprised me even more than the sheer amount of seating, was the seemingly ad-hoc, improvised, or innovative nature of many of the options.  Anywhere there was a surface or some extra space, you were bound to find a cushion, a folding chair, a crate, or some recycled materials inviting you to sit down and take a break.  It wasn’t limited to restaurants and bars either - cushions and chairs could be found on the steps, ledges, sidewalks, and street corners outside of clothing stores, gift shops, and all sorts of other random places.

My visit was in April, presumably the time of year when these chairs and cushions first emerge from winter storage.  I’d be curious to take walk through the city in summertime to see them in greater use, and to see if even more sprout up.  It must create an impressively vibrant street life.

Photos taken April, 2014

Take a seat!

Prefab Home, out from Taschen, documents the history of the factory-made house and features today's most innovative designs. Here, the WeeHouse, inspired by the basic principles of sustainable design--building small and efficiently.

fastcodesign:

The World’s Coolest Prefab Houses

These houses, which can be plopped down nearly anywhere—on roofs, in deserts, on riverbanks—offer stylish alternatives to mobile homes for the contemporary nomad. Some can be built up in the course of a day, then broken down again, like giant Legos. And, as we all know by now, such homes are far more eco-friendly than resource-guzzling McMansions.

Read more>

Prefab is brilliant. More prefab please. 

(via fastcompany)

[Planning Professor Reid] Ewing tracked fewer fatal car crashes in counties with less sprawl. More densely populated counties actually had more car crashes (more traffic), but fatalities were lower. So a person living in Walker County, Georgia, is three times as likely to be killed in a car crash than a person living in Denver County, Colorado.

Urban Sprawl: Get Fat, Stay Poor, And Die In Car Crashes : a new report on metro density says it straight: quality of life improves in compact cities | Fastcodesign.com, 4/7/14 (via atlurbanist)

theatlanticcities:


One commonly held metric is that families should devote no more than about 28 percent of their incomes to housing. But in certain parts of the country, that’s easier said than done. By the end of last year, the median family would need to devote much more than a third — up to nearly forty percent — of its income to mortgage payments on the median home in metros like San Jose (36 percent); San Francisco (39 percent); and Los Angeles (40 percent). These proportions are even higher than in the pre-bubble, pre-crash period of 1985-2000, when the median household would have needed to devote still substantial percentages of its income to afford the median house: 32 percent in New York; 35 percent in Los Angeles; 35 percent in San Jose; and 38 percent in San Francisco.

-The Search for Affordable Housing Is Pushing the Middle Class to the Exurbs   High-res

theatlanticcities:

One commonly held metric is that families should devote no more than about 28 percent of their incomes to housing. But in certain parts of the country, that’s easier said than done. By the end of last year, the median family would need to devote much more than a third — up to nearly forty percent — of its income to mortgage payments on the median home in metros like San Jose (36 percent); San Francisco (39 percent); and Los Angeles (40 percent). These proportions are even higher than in the pre-bubble, pre-crash period of 1985-2000, when the median household would have needed to devote still substantial percentages of its income to afford the median house: 32 percent in New York; 35 percent in Los Angeles; 35 percent in San Jose; and 38 percent in San Francisco.

-The Search for Affordable Housing Is Pushing the Middle Class to the Exurbs

"Across the globe every single day, individuals and communities are making their cities better places through smaller scale projects, improving the lives of urban citizens in the process.”
We want to share those stories of local community development intervention from around the world. Help us do it by providing feedback on our Knight News Challenge submission! Here’s a link, tumblr friends!   High-res

"Across the globe every single day, individuals and communities are making their cities better places through smaller scale projects, improving the lives of urban citizens in the process.”

We want to share those stories of local community development intervention from around the world. Help us do it by providing feedback on our Knight News Challenge submission! Here’s a link, tumblr friends!